Cypress tips and tricks, part 1 : working with single-purpose iframes

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Cypress is a fantastic test automation tool for frontend testing newbies. It has a low barrier to entry, with detailed and helpful documentation. It comes bundled with many of the key components of a full-fledged testing framework, minimising initial configuration. Most importantly, it’s enjoyable to work with, and has a strong community of enthusiastic and helpful users behind it. It’s also quite easy to integrate into CI/CD pipelines, as demonstrated in my previous Cypress post.

In this blog post series I’ll share some tips and tricks for extending Cypress with some clever JS wizardry. All of these solutions are based on my real-world use of the tool on a complex greenfield project.

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Tentative Cypress GitLab CI integration for fun and profit

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Does this Cypress dilemma sound familiar? You’re an exploratory tester who happens to know a bit of JavaScript, so you decide to give Cypress a try. It’s got great documentation (seriously, it’s amazing), requires extremely minimal setup (check out my Cypress Starter Kit) and can provide a lot of value very quickly. After a while, you might find yourself running the tests multiple times a day. By now, you’ve probably demoed your tests to the rest of the team. “Wouldn’t it be great,” you think, “if these tests ran automatically so everyone could benefit from their insight?” There’s only one problem – your DevOps specialists are over-worked and under-resourced. What’s more, you don’t have the know-how to properly integrate Cypress into the frontend dev workflow.

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That’s where this blog post comes in!

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