Jobseeking experiences: Jobcentre Plus

Jobcentre Plus logo

As part of NaBloPoMo (National Blog Posting Month) I’ve decided to blog about my experiences of finding a new job. Despite the late start I hope to make this as daily as possible, so check back soon for more posts.

As some of you may know, I recently finished my job as Communications Manager for LexAble and moved away from Cardiff. I’ve now relocated to Nottinghamshire and currently living with my fiancée Anna and her parents. The two of us hope to move to Sheffield, Wakefield or Leeds in the near future, depending on where the right job is found. Despite being among the 21% of young people who are currently looking for work, I count myself very fortunate that I left my job out of choice, and that I have 18 months of commercial experience under my belt. As part of this I’ve decided to blog about my personal experiences and jobseeking in general. I’ve blogged about this topic previously, albeit only in retrospect. This post will be the first of many in the month of November.

My situation

I’ve been searching for a new Marketing role for about 3 months (1 month full-time). So far I have applied to about 50 different jobs, had a dozen phone interviews and have been to a few in-person job interviews as well. All par for the course in the current climate, but I wanted to get some additional advice and support. My local Jobcentre Plus seemed like a good place to start.

Jobcentre Plus – my experience

Jobcentre Plus logo

At the Jobcentre I spoke to the welcomer at the front desk. Here’s roughly how the conversation went:

Me: I’ve recently moved to this area and have been looking for work for about a month, but I was hoping to get some additional advice and support.
Welcomer:
Have you registered for the Universal Jobmatch website?
Me: No.

[The welcomer explains what Universal Jobmatch is and how it works, then gives me a leaflet]

Welcomer: Are you claiming Jobseekers’ Allowance?
Me: No, not at the moment.
W: Would you like to claim it?
M: Possibly, but not necessarily*.
W: Are you a graduate?
M:
 [I explain my situation and tell her that I have worked in Marketing for the past 18 months.]
W: So how did you get your last job?
M:
 Through work experience.
W: I expect that most of the jobs you’re looking for are available online, either on job boards and our website.
M:
 [I agree.] Are there any other services you offer?
W: It depends what you mean by services.
M:
 Face-to-face advice, for instance.
W: Well, we don’t apply for jobs for you, but we can point you in the right direction. We can also help you to make a CV; do you have one?
M:
 Yes. [I gesture to the folder in my hand.]
W: Is it up to date?
M:
 Yes.
W: If you registered for JSA then you would attend regular interviews. We could help you with your CV and point you in the direction of some jobs to apply to.
M: Are there any services that Jobcentre Plus can offer to people who aren’t claiming JSA?

[The welcomer talks about the Universal Jobmatch website and something called Futures, but doesn’t go into any more detail.]

And that’s pretty much where the conversation ended. Unfortunately I don’t think I got much out of this meeting. I also went back a few minutes later to ask about temp agencies but they weren’t able to help.

Thoughts

  • Even though Jobcentre Plus’ advice wasn’t much help to me, all the staff were friendly and helpful. It was a pleasant environment and they had an open-access computer which people could use to search for jobs.
  • It’s clear that Jobcentre Plus (or at least the branch I visited) is primarily set up to offer advice and support to JSA claimants.
  • It’s unfortunate that there isn’t currently any alternative careers advice available in my town, nor any recruitment agencies. Obviously this isn’t Jobcentre Plus’s fault; I’m sure they would have pointed me towards these places if they existed.
  • As a graduate with pre-existing work experience, an up-to-date CV and access to the internet, I didn’t feel that there was much the Jobcentre could do to help me.
  • Although not stated explicitly, it was implied that I would need to be a JSA claimant to access face-to-face advice. This seems counterintuitive; why should not receiving government benefits exclude me from some of their services? Furthermore, surely it’s better value for the taxpayer if Jobcentre Plus just gave me advice, rather than ask me to claim JSA and give me advice?
  • Universal Jobmatch is a perfectly good job site. But despite being run by the government it is still just one of many and by no means a silver bullet.

JobCentre Plus – how could my experience be improved?

My experience at my local JobCentre Plus branch wasn’t what I’d hoped for, so here’s a few suggestions for improvement:

  • I expect that many Jobcentres are equipped to offer information about other services and advice that may be available (even if it involves travel). That being the case, it should be ensured that this happens no matter where the Jobcentre is located, how big it is etc.
  • My experience with the welcomer was frustrating mainly because I had to ask several times about the services they were able to offer. It would have been better if they had given me an initial overview of what was available. This would allow me to ask about the specific services I was most interested in.
  • Jobseekers’ Allowance is obviously an important part of what DWP offers, but it’s not for everyone. It would be better, therefore, to offer face-to-face advice independent of the JSA scheme, tailored to individual need and circumstance.

Further Discussion

This post is of course just my experience, but I’m sure there’s others in a similar situation to me. If you’re currently looking for work I’d love to hear from you in the comments below, or on Twitter. Was your experience of Jobcentre Plus similar to mine, or completely different?

One thought on “Jobseeking experiences: Jobcentre Plus

  1. […] to live in Yorkshire with my (now-) wife. During my 6 month job hunting period I blogged about my frustrations with Jobcentre Plus and shared my advice for dealing with recruiters. Dozens of applications and 3 job interviews […]

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